Latin Numbers


Latin Numbers & Roman Numerals

The content of this website provides a simple guide to the translation of Latin numbers into English. Learn the English translation of all of the Latin numbers into the English language together with examples and the meaning of Roman Numerals.

Modern use of Latin Numbers & Roman Numerals
This simple guide to the translation of Latin numbers and Roman numerals will increase your Latin vocabulary and help you learn the words in the language associated with numbers and numerals. Although the language is ancient we still use it in our modern world. Probably the most common example in the use of this ancient numeric system is on many clock faces in which the hours are marked as I to XII. Latin-Roman Numerals are used in English and other modern languages especially in relation to dates. This ancient style of Latin-Roman numbers are also used as version numbers of products e.g. Version II or on reports e.g. Appendix IV.  Latin Roman numerals are used for sporting events such as the Super Bowl and the Olympics can also be seen on monuments, public buildings and gravestones.

 
 

Modern Latin Numbers & Roman Numerals
Latin-Roman numbers are used for the copyright dates on films, television programmes and videos, for example the Latin Roman numbers MMXIII translate as 2013.

Many Roman numerals are simply added together. Our example of the numbers MMXIII that translate as 2013 as follows: each 'M' stands for 1000, 'X' stands for 10 and each letter 'I' stands for a single number or digit.

M + M =2000
X =10
I + I + I =3
MM + X+ III translates as 2000 + 10 + 3 = 2013

MMXIII

(2013)

 

Latin Phrases, Numbers & Roman Numerals
The use of this ancient numerical system therefore still survives in many walks of everyday life in modern times.  King Henry VIII is correct whereas referring to the king as Henry the 8th, or Henry 8, is not! It is not surprising that we look for a simple, free, online translator to enable us to understand the meaning of this ancient numbering system.

We have included articles on all the numbers with the translation of the words into the ancient language from numbers 1 - 1000. Examples of the Roman numerals for each number are also included. The Latin language and numbering system is still commonly used as part of our English language and vocabulary.

 

Latin Numbers & Roman Numerals versus Arabic Numbers
Our number system, which is called Arabic numbers, consists of have ten digits from 1-9 and 0. We use all ten numbers to count to nine, then we combine them to make bigger numbers. The ancient Romans repeated symbols, so number 1 was I and number 2 was II. The ancient Romans did not use a zero.

Latin Numbers & Roman Numerals - the Rules
For larger numbers, the Romans invented new numeric symbols, so number 5 was V, number 10 was X, and so on.

If a lower value symbol is after a higher value number, it is added so VI = 6

If a lower value symbol is before a higher value number, it is subtracted so IV = 4

Latin Numbers & Roman Numerals - Seven Simple Letters!
Roman numerals are a simple, numerical system that is composed of just seven letters. The letters are, in this order, from lower to higher: I, V, X, L, C, D and M. Roman numbers, or numerals, are formed from traditional combinations of these seven simple letters or symbols.
Each letter, or symbol, represents a different number.

I = 1, V = 5, X = 10, L = 50, C = 100, D = 500, M = 1000

Latin Numbers and Letters

The numbering system did not include ZERO

 

How to remember the Symbols and Letters!
The following helpful tip will help you to remember the symbols and letters used in the old numeric system.

"My Dear Cousin Loves extra Vegetables"
 

MyM1000
DearD500
CousinC100
LovesL50
ExtraX10
VegetablesV5
 

The History of Latin Numbers & Roman Numerals
The origin and history of this old classical numbering system was not documented by the historians of ancient Rome, however they were used by the
Etruscans. The Etruscan numeric system was adapted from the Greek Attic numerals that provided the ideas for the later Roman numerals. The most obvious explanation of its origins is probably due to their counting system that was originally based on a counting method using the fingers. A single stroke of the pen would represent one finger and this translated to the number I. The additional letters used in the numerical system is based on the old  word 'centum' meaning 100 and the word 'mille' meaning 1000 thus giving the numerals C and M.

Latin Numbers & Roman Numerals
The interesting facts and information about this ancient, classical number system provides a simple guide to the translation of each number into the English language.
Learn the English translation of all of the numbers into the English language together with examples and the meaning of all of the numerics. Find the words and phrases to help you learn the classical ancient language and understand the common phrases that are still used in modern times. An easy translation of every common number up to 1 million.

 

Latin Numbers & Roman Numerals

Improve your vocabulary
Simple, fast, easy translation
Understand the ancient language & terminology
Info to help you translate numeric symbols
Learn the meaning of the numeric symbols
Examples and translation of words
Numeric symbols used in Ancient Rome
Classic numbering used in the language of Rome
 

Latin - Italy - Vocabulary - Number - Numbers - Roman Numerals - Numeral - Dictionary - Phrases - Translation - English To Latin - Study Guide - Learn - Words - Quotes - Language - Translate - Meaning - Free - Online - Kids - Children - Count - Counting - Basic - Speak - Simple - Easy - Translator - Find - Lesson --Vocabulary - Number - Numbers - Roman Numerals - Numeral - Dictionary - Phrases - Translation - Kids - Children - Count - Counting - Speak - English To Latin - Study Guide - Learn - Words - Language - Translate - Meaning - Free - Online - Kids - Children - Count - Counting - Basic - Speak - Simple - Easy - Translator - Find - Lesson - Kids - Children - Count - Counting - Speak

Latin Numbers & Roman Numerals

June 2014 Siteseen Ltd.

Cookie PolicyBy Linda AlchinPrivacy Statement